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Foraging, anyone?

I put this under "hiking," but I have also combined trail running and bicycling with the search for wild food.

The COVID-19 shutdown has meant that I have more time to roam the woods near our house in search of wild eats. We have been harvesting ramps, the delicious food that encourages social distancing; succulent trout lily leaves; lots of fat fiddleheads; and even a few morels.

Is anyone else into foraging? What are your current favorite treats from the woods?

“But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.”― Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huck Finn
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Re: Foraging, anyone?

@TomIrvine ,  My wife and I were just discussing this topic last weekend.  She has a book she bought on edible wild plants (leaves, berries, and such).  I started reading it and found it quite challenging.

I just keep imagining the scene in the movie, "Into The Wild", where he eats the wrong plant and messes him up bad.

We have a friend here in Central Virginia that teaches classes on plants that are indigenous to our region.  Before I ingest anything other than blackberries, blueberries, or strawberries, I'm going to take her class to learn the things that I can eat.

Cajun 

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Re: Foraging, anyone?

I pretty much stick to things that I can't screw up, things that are easy to identify. Blueberries, come mid summer, definitely qualify!

“But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.”― Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huck Finn
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Re: Foraging, anyone?

Pinyon nuts!  Delicious!

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Re: Foraging, anyone?

Never heard of 'em. What kind of habitat do they grow in?

“But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.”― Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huck Finn
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Re: Foraging, anyone?

Wait for it - they grow in pinyon pine forests of course - found in the southwest at altitudes just below the ponderosa pine  belt(4,000 - 5,000 feet or so).  They are an indication you are leaving the desert behind as you ascend.

The cones mature in the fall and the nuts can be picked from the opening cones.  I have fond memories of working at Mesa Verde, foraging for p nuts, in between giving guided tours of the cliff dwellings.

Since prehistoric times, pinyons have been a staple in the diet of inhabitants of the region.

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Re: Foraging, anyone?

@TomIrvine we had an avid group of employees and customers who loved to go mushroom hunting around the Olympia WA area. They also picked nettles to cook with!

At REI, we believe a life outdoors is a life well-lived.
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Re: Foraging, anyone?

You use the past-tense. What happened to them? Nuthin' bad, I hope.

“But I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me and sivilize me, and I can't stand it. I been there before.”― Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huck Finn
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Re: Foraging, anyone?

@TomIrvine ha! Nothing bad, I just moved away...

At REI, we believe a life outdoors is a life well-lived.
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