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Isobutane canister weight

I use a canister stove for backpacking.  I weigh my canisters before each trip and calculate how much fuel I need plus a bit of reserve, then take the canister that has that much or slightly more. On rare occasion I will take two partial canisters. The point of this post is actually about the empty weight of these canisters. I had 3 empties sitting around the house, so I made sure that they were empty and weighed them. I had two Primus canisters, one weighed 146 grams and one weighed 144 grams. I also had a Coleman canister and it weighed 141 grams. This made me wonder how much variance there is in empty canister weight, because I've always just used 141 when calculating how much was left. Does anyone else have empty weights of different brands? I wouldn't think there would be a huge range of weights because I can't imagine that there are very many companies actually making the canister. Probably the best thing to do would be to weigh each one as I buy them and subtract 230, because the amount of gas is probably really close to spec. On another note, the Primus and Jetboil canisters that I have are 230 grams and the Coleman is 220...... Seems like Coleman is just shorting you ten grams. BTW, I use 230 gram canisters because that's all that I can buy near me.

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Re: Isobutane canister weight

Following.  I always figured the cans were the same just with different logos (though I have seen two slightly different designs.).  I believe I have an almost empty MSR can that I can weigh after this weekend's trip.  Jetboil says their can empty is 126.  Do you pop open your cans to ensure they're empty? 

If there are differences in the different brands, I'd think the ultralight camps would be claiming it in how to decrease weights, though they probably only eat cold food or use liquid and catfood cans, ha,ha.

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Re: Isobutane canister weight

I use my stove to burn out the last bit, then leave it open for a minute. Of course there's always the question of "how accurate are digital kitchen scales?"

I have no desire to go without warm meals, I can do un-warmed lunch and possibly breakfast, but supper is going to be warm LOL.

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Re: Isobutane canister weight

great topic, I love this one.  The net weight on the can is how much fuel in the can, normally the net weight listed on the small canisters is 100 gr, the weight of the entire canister on the scale will be 230gr or so.  When you get back from a trip and the total weight is, say, 180gr, you have used about 50gr of the 100gr of fuel in the canister.  I wouldn't worry so much about he canister weight or variance in brands, go by the net weight printed on the canister (100gr= amount of actual fuel) and what ever the total weight is when you first purchase it.  BTW there is a $20 valve you can buy on amazon to drain (transfer) unused fuel to another partly emply can.  I made a step by step video on my youtube channel on how to do this.  It is an EXTREMELY SAFE process, never have to throw away partials again! https://youtu.be/BtaUmcpgNVc

hope this helps

(REI member since 1979)

REI Member Since 1979 YouTube.com/philreedshikes
A "shout out" to Gunny for pointing me to these processes
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Re: Isobutane canister weight

I have the transfer valve, and it's easy to use. I've decided the best thing to do is to make sure that I weigh and mark each canister when I buy it. I was dealing with some that I hadn't weighed up front, different brands and such. I don't mind keeping a few partial canisters around, because I don't need a full canister unless I'm out for a week or more. A half canister will cover 3 nights easy. Thanks

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